jump to navigation

ARM ready to move into the netbook market 25 October, 2008

Posted by aronzak in Netbooks.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
add a comment

Currently ARM, a processor manufacturer makes chips only for phones, PDAs and the like. Currently,  only Intel and VIA chips (the Atom and C7-M) have been used much, with low uptake of AMD’s Geode and the Longsoon.

The ARM Cortex A9The ARM Cortex A9

Recently, AMD have started to move into computing markets with Dell releasing “Blacktop” a blackberry like splashtop interface that specially boots using a low power ARM processor. Next, it seems like ARM may move into the netbook market with low power processors, the Cortex A8 and Cortex A9. I’d be in favour of more competition. It seemed that the launch of the Atom coincided with increaced interest in producing good quality machines that could do more than email.

Advertisements

Lenovo joins the crowd in not offering Linux 11 August, 2008

Posted by aronzak in Cloud Computing, Linux, Netbooks, Vista, Windows.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,
add a comment

Lenovo has unveiled a new series, the Ideapas S series. With two optionsa available, the S9 and the S10, sporting a choice of XP or Linux, Australain and US consumers will get the choice of the 10 inch model only and XP only. Why? There’s absolutely no reasonable explanation. Unlike the others, like MSI that just delayed the Linux model (but of course they had enough parts for the XP model to launch on time) or Asus, making the Linux version of the 900 series more expensive than the XP model, Lenovo has made up no excuse as to why Linux models cannot be offered here. But the US? That’s steep. They offer SLED versions of the Thinkpad there and not here. So does Dell with Ubuntu, again not here. And so does HP, offering a SLED mininote there, but I haven’t seen one here (probably available at an online retailer). Same with the linux version of the Acer Aspire.

And yet we keep applauding each manufacturer that joins the fray and offers a nonexistant Linux computer. I don’t think that the Linux netbook market really exists. Yes, there are low cost devices that are aimed at poor people, and education. But they aren’t available for retail.  Then there are the ‘consumer’ Linux models. But they suck, pure and simple. They are usually small, low speced seven inch models, with tiny screens and keyboards. Reviewers always seem to point out the difficult to use touch pad (especially the cloudbook’s), fairly short battery life, etc…

So, if you want a good netbook, you’ll be wanting an 8.9-10 inch model. And you’ll have to pay more, and that means that it’s that much easier to slip in the cost of a MS license. Manufacturers use dodgy pricing and confusing configurations to mask the cost of the Windows operation system, and to make higher margins. And the Linux versions that everyone is raving about seem to dry up. And I’m getting sick of another hyped up product that I’ll never see in a shop, or never consider buying.